Current working overview of the thesis

‘An ethnography of emotion and morality on the Yolŋu Homelands: toward a local Indigenous theory of morality and value in social exchange.’

Chapter 1
I’m putting all the floating parts of this chapter together at the moment (which is why I’m clarifying the following structural details).

Chapter 2
Chapter two will introduce the basic social forms and social relations through which expectations about morality and value are articulated. These social forms are usually considered in terms of kinship and social organization.

The material in this chapter will cast them in terms of individual and shared understandings about personhood (the self, others, and the nature of the relationship between them).

Introduction
2.1 Overview of the literature on Yolŋu kinship and social organization.
2.2 Casting concepts of ‘inside/outside’, ‘madayin’ and ‘waŋarr’ in terms of understandings about the self, others and the relationship between them drawing on transcripts of talk about ‘who I am; who we are’.
2.3 Casting salient forms of kinship and social organization in terms of individual and shared understandings about personhood drawing on five diagrammatic models of the ‘self’ and transcripts of associated exegesis.
2.4 Exploring the motivational and directive force of these models of personhood and relatedness through attendant understandings and expectations about what is the proper, right way of doing things. This is the motivational and directive force of ‘rom’.
Conclusions

Chapter 3
Chapter three will introduce a body of key terms and concepts associated with emotion and morality.

Introduction
3.1 Introducing two key concepts associated with personhood and affect, ‘ŋayaŋu’ and ‘dhäkay’
3.2 Introducing key terms and concepts associated with a normal, positive or desirable state of feeling/states of relations
3.3 Introducing key terms and concepts associated with a negative, disruptive or undesirable state of feeling/state of relations
3.4Yothu-Yindi’: introducing one of many cultural elaboratations on the theme of the self and significant others as fundamentally and mutually interdependent
Conclusions

Chapter 4
Chapter four is the first of four case study based middle chapters.

The aim of this chapter is to explore how cultural understandings associated with emotion and morality play out in and shape everyday forms of interpersonal exchange and the general flow of sociality in everyday life on the Homelands.

The case-studies included in this chapter are representative of the most quotidian scenes that characterize social life on the Homelands; with the exception of case study 4.4 they are representative of unremarkable forms of interpersonal exchange and a generally unmarked (i.e. balanced and normative), flow of social relations.

Introduction
4.1 Case study: A trip to the nearby township to pick up kin from ceremony: illustrating familiar aspects of everyday sociality and the flow of healthy, happy state of relations.
4.2 Case study: Visiting a nearby Homeland Community for a funeral ceremony.
4.3 Case study: Cutting the road to Gikal at the end of the wet-season.
4.4 Case study: The specter of estrangement and being without kin.
Conclusions

Chapter 5
The aim of this chapter is to explore how cultural understandings associated with emotion and morality cast issues of responsibility for/in social action. The case studies included in this chapter focus on social processes entailed in the allocation and attribution of responsibility.

Introduction
5.1 Following the string and making it straight: looking at the attribution of responsibility in an extended case study of conflict.
5.2 Extended exegesis, analysis and discussion of case study 5.1, retracing the anatomy of events.
5.3 Exploring the attribution of responsibility in a minor case study of conflict: Axing the extension cord in lieu of playing the play-station.
5.4 Locating responsibility in cases where one might expect to be liable for praise: two brief vignettes.
Conclusions

Chapter 6
The aim of this chapter is to explore how cultural understandings associated with emotion and morality shape forms of material exchange and associated ideas of value.

The case studies included in this chapter are representative of everyday forms or instances of material exchange involving money and/or material goods.

Introduction
6.1 Introducing key terms and concepts associated with giving, taking and ‘exchange.’
6.2 Exploring three quotidian case studies of material exchange on the Homelands.
6.3 Exploring two case studies involving ‘direct’ speech acts in material exchange: comparing local ideas about morality with the idea of ‘demand-sharing’.
6.4 Observations about the role and use of bank-cards and telephones
Conclusions

Chapter 7
The aim of this chapter is to explore how cultural understandings associated with emotion and morality shape forms of intercultural exchange and associated ideas about morality and value in intercultural relations.

Introduction
7.1 An overview of perceived differences between ‘Mission Time’ and ‘Government Time’ intercultural relations.
7.2 Money and the Market: alienated vs non-alienated relations as a key difference between the morality of intercultural relations in Mission Time vs Government Time
7.3 Bureaucracy and fetishization of paper: alienated vs non-alienated relations as a key difference between the morality of intercultural relations in Mission Time vs Government Time
7.4 Reciprocity and mutual interdependence: the varying capacity of Balanda to recognize and realize difference as a value as a key difference between the morality of intercultural relations in Mission Time vs Government Time
Conclusions

Chapter eight: reprise and recommendations for further research

I’m still not sold on the current version of this chapter.

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